Tag Archives: Thai

Steamed Fish with Lime and Garlic

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Steamed Fish with Lime and Garlic

Aftermath of digging in before I remembered to take a picture..

Another recipe that I’ve tried and loved from eatingthaifood.com. I’ve actually tasted this on one of those random shopping trips in Bangkok, and I never thought I’d be able to recreate it at home. But I did! I think the real star of the flavours are the lime, chilli and the broth. When I cooked this dish, I did not notice that I was out of coriander and omitted it. It still tasted fantastic. Here’s the recipe. 

Author: Mark Wiens

Ingredients

For the fish:

  • 1 whole barramundi, about 1 – 2 kilos (or whatever size you can get), guts and gills already removed
  • 5 stalks lemongrass, bottom half only, smashed, and cut into chunks

For the sauce / soup:

  • 1 cup good chicken stock or fish stock (fresh or canned)
  • 2 Tbsp finely chopped palm sugar
  • 8 Tbsp lime juice
  • 6 Tbsp fish sauce
  • 2 heads of garlic, chopped
  • Thai chilies to taste, finely chopped
  • 20 – 25 sprigs cilantro, chopped
  • 1- 2 stalks Chinese celery, cut into 1-inch pieces

Instructions

  1. Make sure your fish is scaled and gutted, and then score the fish with 3 diagonal incisions on each side of the fish. Cut off the top halves of the lemongrass, bruise, and stuff the lemongrass into the cavity of the fish. Steam the fish over high boiling water for about 10 – 15 minutes depending on the size of your fish.
  2. In a saucepan, heat the chicken stock until it comes to a boil, and then toss in the sugar, reduce heat, and boil until the sugar is completely dissolved. Pour the mixture into a bowl and set aside.
  3. Mince the garlic, chilies, and cilantro, and mix into the chicken stock soup, along with fish sauce and lime juice. Stir gently and then taste test. Make sure it’s sour, and balanced with a hint of sweetness.
  4. When the fish is fully steamed, transfer it to a serving platter (with edges to keep in the soup), garnish with a bed of Chinese celery, and place the fish on the platter. Gently scoop on all the sauce over the fish, putting most of the garlic and chilies on the top of the fish.
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Thai Basil Chicken 

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Thai Basil Chicken 

Recently, a new stall popped up in my workplace canteen selling Thai food. I tried the Thai Basil chicken rice and fell in love with it. Being the nosey one, I decided to go online and do a search for the recipe and I found this one and I fell in love with it all over again! T ride cooking it just last night and couldn’t wait to put up a post for it today. So here’s the very simple but oh so heavenly recipe for this marvellous dish.

Here’s my rendition of the dish from last night! 

Ingredients

For the egg

  • 1 egg
  • 2 tablespoons of oil for frying

Basil chicken

  • 1 chicken breast (or any other cut of boneless chicken, about 200 grams)
  • 5 cloves of garlic
  • 4 Thai chilies
  • 1 tablespoon oil for frying
  • 1 teaspoon of oyster sauce
  • ½ teaspoon light soy sauce
  • ½ teaspoon sugar
  • 1 splash of dark soy sauce
  • 1 handful of Thai holy basil leaves

Instructions

First, fry the egg

  1. Heat about 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil in a wok or frying pan on high-medium heat.
  2. When the oil is hot and sizzling, drop in the egg. Let it sizzle and bubble up, and at the same time, splash some of the hot oil onto the top of the egg (don’t flip the egg, unless you really want to).
  3. After the egg looks about right to your cooked likeness (I like mine runny), take it out, drain the excess oil, and put it on a plate for later.

Basil chicken

  1. Cut the chicken into small bite sized pieces.
  2. Rinse and peel the garlic and chilies, and pound them in a mortar and pestle (alternatively you can just mince them with a knife). They don’t need to be super fine, you just want to bring out the oils and flavors from the garlic and chilies.
  3. Pluck a good sized handful of holy basil leaves off the stems.
  4. Now it’s time to start cooking. Heat your wok on high heat, and add about 1 tablespoon of oil to the pan.
  5. When the oil is hot, add the chilies and garlic. Stir fry them for about 20 seconds or so until they get really fragrant, but don’t let them burn or get too dry.
  6. Toss in your chicken. Keep stir frying continuously. At this stage you want to continue to stir and cook your chicken until it’s just about fully cooked all the way through (depending on the size pieces of chicken and how hot your fire is, it should take about 2 – 3 minutes). If it starts to get dry, add just a tiny splash of water.
  7. Add 1 teaspoon of oyster sauce, ½ teaspoon light soy sauce, ½ teaspoon sugar, and finally a splash of dark soy sauce. Keep stir frying for about another 30 seconds.
  8. Grab a handful of holy basil, toss it into the pan, fold it into the chicken, and then immediately turn off the heat (if you’re using an electric stove, you’ll want to remove the pan from the burner). The holy basil really only needs to cook for about 5 seconds, and it will continue to wilt and cook from the existing heat of the chicken. This step is important because if you cook the basil for too long, it loses some of its glorious flavor and gets slightly chewy.